0      0

eSymposia | The Microbiome: From Mother to Child


Maternal obesity impacts newborn microbiota Enterobacteriaceae produced LPS and reprograms bone marrow derived macrophages: a trained immunity phenotype in early life.


Jan 18, 2021 12:00am ‐ Jan 18, 2021 12:00am

Description

Maternal obesity impacts newborn microbiota Enterobacteriaceae produced LPS and reprograms bone marrow derived macrophages: a trained immunity phenotype in early life. Robins WP1, Soderborg TK2, Barbour LA2, Hernandez T2, Frank D2, Krebs NA2, Jonscher KA3, and Friedman JE2,3 1Dept. of Microbiology, Harvard Medical School, 2University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, 3University of Oklahoma School of Medicine, Harold Hamm Diabetes Center. The neonatal fecal microbiota is normally dominated early with Enterobacteriaceae (EntB), a necessary primer for immune activation. The colonization of certain EntB strains in the newborn infant as founders may therefore have a profound influence on microbiota succession in early life and also the regulation and programming of the infant innate immune system. To begin to investigate how changes in EntB shapes the innate immune system, we collected stool from two distinct newborn infant cohorts, those from mothers with high >30 or normal

Speaker(s):

  • Jacob Friedman, PhD, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center School of Medicine

You must be logged in and own this session in order to post comments.

Print Certificate
Completed on: token-completed_on
Print Transcript
Please select the appropriate credit type:
/
test_id: 
credits: 
completed on: 
rendered in: 
* - Indicates answer is required.
token-content

token-speaker-name
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
/
/
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content