0      0

eSymposia | Optimizing Nutrition for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health


Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Breast Milk and infant neurobehavioral development


Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Description

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals in Breast Milk and infant neurobehavioral development Breast milk is the most important nutrition source for infants and it plays a key role in infant development. The composition of human milk includes endogenous and exogenous substances, among them endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) of human production. EDCs (e.g., phthalates, bisphenol A, Heavy metals, Glyphosate, Pyrethroid, Polychlorobiphenyl, Flame retardants, and Dioxin-like) can disrupt the programming of endocrine signaling pathways during development, resulting in adverse effects, some of which may not be apparent until much later in life. Current evidence shows the presence of single and mixture of EDCs compounds in breast milk and links the exposure to EDCs (in utero or by breastfeeding) to a variety of health and reproductive outcomes leading to impairment of reproductive, neurobehavioral, metabolic, and immunologic functions. Specifically, neonatal EDCs exposure appears to have a negative impact on the infant’s cognitive, language, motor, socio-emotional and behavioral development. Here I discuss the experimental and epidemiological evidence regarding the presence of EDCs in breastmilk, their potential effects on infant neurobehavioral development and the need for public health measures to reduce maternal and infant exposure. Specifically, I will address the following issues: (i) breast milk as a potential key biomarker for evaluating environmental exposure of mother-child pairs to EDCs (ii) how exposure to EDCs can impact short- and long-term infant development, highlighting which developmental areas are most affected; (iii) the presence of critical and sensitive period in which infant exposure may have major consequences for developmental outcomes; and (iv) possible factors that can lower maternal and infant exposure to EDCs or have a protective role on infant neurodevelopment. Overall, the a lack of knowledge on the levels and consequences of EDCs exposure through maternal milk highlights the need for preclinical and human prospective and longitudinal research in order to develop risk models and public policies aimed to improve infants’ health status through human milk surveillance and monitoring. In this view, the European Commission Life Program recently funded the Life MILCH Project, a pilot study that will determine the correlation between levels of maternal milk contamination/exposure to EDCs and infants neurobehavioral health. M. Maddalena Brambilla, Davide Ponzi, Silvia Paterlini, Paola Palanza Unit of Neuroscience, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Parma (Italy)

Speaker(s):

You must be logged in and own this session in order to post comments.

Print Certificate
Completed on: token-completed_on
Print Transcript
Please select the appropriate credit type:
/
test_id: 
credits: 
completed on: 
rendered in: 
* - Indicates answer is required.
token-content

token-speaker-name
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
/
/
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content