eSymposia | Optimizing Nutrition for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

Oct 21, 2020 ‐ Oct 23, 2020



Sessions

El programa Ceres Mujer Salud y Vida (Nutricion y ejercicio nuestro mayor beneficio) comprende entre otras las siguientes líneas de acción:

Oct 20, 2020 3:00pm ‐ Oct 20, 2020 5:00pm

Speaker(s):

Impact of nutrition literacy on birth outcome of migrant pregnant women from urban slums

Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Impact of nutrition literacy on birth outcome of migrant pregnant women from urban slums Arshi Mehboob1, Divya Sanghi Manav Rachna International Institute of Research and Studies1, Faridabad Background: Nutrition forms the foundation for human development, especially in the early stages of life, setting the trajectory for growth and development that continues through infancy, childhood, and adulthood, by enhancing cumulative lifetime learning capabilities and adult productivity. In India, women are especially vulnerable to the health effects of poor nutrition not only due to their high nutritional requirements for child-bearing and rearing, but also their excessively greater chances of living in poverty, lower levels of schooling and lacking rights to ownership and decision-making power in the household and community. A third of women of reproductive age in India are undernourished, with a body mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5 kg/m2 according to NFHS4 data. Moreover, the migrant population households generally have low economic returns, hence nutrition in food remains low. Method: The pilot randomized, controlled intervention trial will test the low-cost food-based approach by improving knowledge in pregnant women living in low/mid-income households in urban slums and validate its impact on diet diversity of the participants. Same number of healthy pregnant women will be recruited for controls. The study will also postulate that follow up will result in high adoption rates of the intervention by evaluating dietary intakes and quality of dietary proteins and specific micro-nutrients before and during pregnancy. The intervention impact will be evaluated from the birth outcome through anthropometric measurements and nutritional biochemistry profiles in the mother’s blood and cord blood. Results: The relationship between the variables of the two group, Case vs control will be analyzed using the suitable statistical methods and tools to reveal the findings of the study. The anthropometry, clinical and socio-demographic data will be analysed for both the groups. Conclusion: The study intends to answer the role of improving maternal nutrition in promoting healthy birth outcomes. Similarly, the literacy levels of nutrition during pregnancy may play a role to improve pregnancy outcomes.

Speaker(s):
  • Arshi Mehboob, MSc, Manav Rachna International Institute of Research and Studies

Are the Nutrition Rehabilitation Centres serving the ‘purpose’? A study in Palghar district of Maharashtra

Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Are the Nutrition Rehabilitation Centres serving the ‘purpose’? A study in Palghar district of Maharashtra Authors: Vidula Purohit, Prashant Kulkarni, Dr Shilpa Karvande, Rajendra Kale and Dr Nerges Mistry Background In India 4.7 million tribal children are suffering from under-nutrition (UNICEF India 2019) and Nutrition Rehabilitation Centres (NRCs) have been established to provide therapeutic nourishment and care to the under-nourished children for minimizing the severe impacts of under-nutrition on their survival, growth and development. NRCs provide in-patient care to the admitted children till they meet the defined discharge criteria such as 15% weight gain, monitor their progress for three months through four follow-up visits to NRC and conduct activities for improving skills of family caregivers regarding proper caring and feeding practices. Hence NRCs are considered as a bridge between hospital care and home care of under-nourished children. Palghar district of Maharashtra has around three million population of which 37.4% is scheduled tribe population (Census 2011). The predominantly tribal areas of Palghar have high prevalence of under-nutrition in the children aged 1-6 years (Ghosh et al 2019). The district has five NRCs across eight blocks. As a part of the larger study “Capacity building of healthcare providers from eight blocks of Palghar District, Maharashtra in maternal and newborn health care and nutrition” an exploratory study was undertaken in Palghar to understand the role of NRCs in providing services to under-nourished children. Overall aim of this study was to understand the functioning of NRCs from the tribal dominant district by-a) evaluating the outcome indicators of management of children admitted in the NRCs and b) learning about the perspectives of caregivers. Methods Monthly performance reports of the five NRCs from Palghar district for the period of April 2019 to March 2020 were reviewed and analysed. Additionally, family caregivers (n=25) of the children who availed services of NRCs were interviewed to learn about their understanding of NRC functioning and interaction with the providers at NRCs using a semi structured interview tool. Interviews’ participants recruited through convenience sampling. Results Profile of malnourished children admitted to NRCs in Palghar Children admitted in NRCs during April 2019 to March 2020 (n=948) Age group Age-Below six months of age 32 (3.4%) Age- six months to 2 years 586 (61.8%) Age-2 years to 5 years 200 (32.7%) Sex Male 486 (51.3%) Female 462 (48.7%) Caste Scheduled tribe 948 (100%) Duration of stay Less than 7 days 125 (13.2%) 7 days to 15 days 801 (84.5%) More than 15 days 22 (2.32%) Expected weight gain 15% weight gain at the time of discharge 485 (54.4%) 15% weight gain during follow-up visits 273 (30.6%) Did not gain 15% weight either at the time of discharge or during follow-up visits 134 (15.0%) Follow-up visit Completed first follow-up 761 (85.3%) Completed fourth follow-up 478 (53.6%) Family care givers (n=25) of children - who were they and what did they say? We interviewed 14 family care givers of children admitted in the NRCs and 11 family care givers who were at the NRCs for a follow-up visit of their children. A typical family care giver was a married mother with a mean age 28.43 years. She was an agricultural labour and had at least two living children. Family care givers of admitted children- Most of the family care givers (12/14) were aware that their child had to stay at the NRC for 14 days, and their stay and food arrangements would be borne by the NRC and they would get INR 100 per day towards loss of wages during the stay at NRC. Ten family care givers reported that they had received information about how to feed their child, of which only six were reportedly involved in preparing food for their children during NRC stay. They learned to prepare nutritious recipes in the form of kheer (porridge), rajgeera laddus (mixture of amaranth, sugar and ghee shaped into ball) and sprouts and were counselled to continue feeding these food items to their children after discharge. Out of 14, only two were aware that after the discharge they need to bring their child to the NRC for four follow-up visits in the span of three months. Family care givers of follow-up children- None of them (0/11) was aware that they had to bring their child to NRC for four follow-up visits in the span of three months from the NRC discharge, however most of them (10/11) knew that they should take their child to the health facility if child gets fever, cold or cough, stomach pain, diarrhoea/dysentery. Discussion and conclusion All the five NRCs from the Palghar district catered about 1000 children from April 2019 to March 2020. All the admitted children belonged to scheduled tribe with equal number of girls and boys and 61.8% of children were in the age group of six months to 2 years. It confirms that transition from breastfeeding to complementary feeding is a weak area in Palghar and calls for urgent intervention. Of the total, 85% children reported to have gained the expected 15% of weight (as per the NRC programme) either during their stay or during the follow-up visits within the span of three months from NRC discharge. However, 15% could not gain their weight which is a point of concern. Only about half of them completed all the four follow-up visits, and very few family care givers were aware of its importance. However the available data don’t provide answers to the questions such as ‘Why these 15% children couldn’t achieve expected weight gain?’ ‘What happened to the children who didn’t complete four follow-up visits?’ Hence detailed analysis is essential about these parameters of performance of NRCs and expected follow-up to keep-up the gains achieved during the stay at NRC and prevent relapse. Improving communication between NRC providers and family care givers of admitted children is vital in boosting up the facility based follow-up and home-based care to sustain improved nutritional status of children discharged from NRCs.

Speaker(s):

Leveraging community health workers for the delivery of nutrition interventions: insights from a study in Zambézia, Mozambique

Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Leveraging community health workers for the delivery of nutrition interventions: insights from a study in Zambézia, Mozambique Briana Stone1*, Réka Maulide Cane2, Talata Sawadogo-Lewis1, Júlia Sambo2, Shannon E. King1, Rui Langa2, Gildo Muchanga1, Abel Drafana2, Cristolde Salomão2, Elias Matusse2, Timothy Roberton1 1 Institute for International Programs at Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, USA. 2 Instituto Nacional de Saúde, Ministério da Saúde, Maputo, Mozambique. Background: In Mozambique, the national prevalence of under-five stunting is 42.3% and under-five wasting is 4.42%[1]. Recognizing chronic malnutrition as the main problem affecting children under five, Mozambique introduced a nutritional intervention package (PIN) to be delivered by CHWs (known locally as Agentes Polivalentes Elementares – APEs) to contribute to reducing chronic malnutrition[2]. In 2017, the PIN was approved and implemented in 8 provinces whose prevalence of chronic malnutrition is over 35%, which included Zambézia. We carried out this study to gather information on the implementation strength of the APE program in Zambézia province. For this analysis, we assessed the current state of APE’s knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding child and maternal nutrition and potential opportunities for integrating nutrition into their training curriculum and delivery of services. Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional survey of APEs in Zambezia province, using single-stage cluster sampling, with districts as primary sampling units. Of our 6 randomly selected districts, one had received training on the PIN. Our questionnaire was developed based on competencies and actions that CHWs in countries with a heavy nutrition focus in their CHW programming are expected to have. The questionnaire included general nutrition issue prioritization questions and questions on six nutrition domains to gage specific knowledge of key nutrition interventions and whether APEs carry them out or not. There were 28 knowledge-based questions and 15 questions on activities carried out. We accounted for our two-stage sampling methodology and response rates using sampling weights and finite population correction. For each nutrition domain, we calculated the average percent of questions correctly answered and the average percent of nutrition activities an APE reported carrying out. We conducted two simple linear regressions to determine if there is a difference in average nutrition knowledge and average nutrition activities between APEs that received nutrition training and those that did not. Results: APEs on average correctly answered 74% of the nutrition knowledge-based questions and reported carrying out on average 49% of nutrition activities. APEs had the highest average percent correct for questions regarding anemia prevention and the lowest for growth monitoring questions. APEs that received PIN training were statistically significantly associated with a higher average percent of correctly answered questions (P= 0.014, 95% CI: 3.05% – 17.07%) and reported a statistically significantly lower average percent of nutrition activities carried out (P=0.023, 95% CI: -6.41% – -0.79%). Conclusion: Our findings show that many APEs, but not all, had nutrition knowledge and were active around a number of areas, particularly anemia prevention and childbirth nutrition. Those that received PIN training had a higher average percent of questions correctly answered but reported carrying out fewer nutrition activities. There is room to improve training to reinforce knowledge and practices among all APEs to respond to local nutrition-related needs. In order to leverage the APE program to improve nutrition, an enabling environment is needed to ensure that knowledge gained during training is aligned with activities carried out. References: 1. Levels and trends in child malnutrition. UNICEF/WHO/World Bank Group Joint Child Malnutrition Estimates. New York, Geneva and Washington (DC): United Nations Children’s Fund, World Health Organization and the World Bank Group; 2020. 2. Ministry of Health of Mozambique. Multisectoral action plan for the reduction of chronic undernutrition in Mozambique 2011 – 2015 (2020) [Internet]. Maputo; 2010 [cited 2020 Oct 12]. Available from: http://scalingupnutrition.org/wp-content Acknowledgments: We would like to acknowledge and thank the following members of the Technical Working Group of the Platform for Women's, Children's Health and Nutrition of the National Observatory of Health (PSMCN-ONS, Mozambique): Acacio Sabonete, Antonio Junior, Ananias Antonio, Diana Quelhas, Fernando Padama, Humberto Rodrigues, Maria Patricia Goncalves, Marla Amaro, Miguel Luis, Ofelia Rambique.

Speaker(s):

Structural readiness of health facilities for implementing maternal and child nutrition services in Mozambique

Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Structural readiness of health facilities for implementing maternal and child nutrition services in Mozambique Réka Maulide Cane1,4*, Ashely Sheffel5, Cristolde Salomão1, Júlia Sambo1,4, Elias Matusse1, Edmilson Ismail2, Ananias António2, Érica Manuel3, Talata Sawadogo-Lewis5, Timothy Roberton5 1Instituto Nacional de Saúde, Ministry of Health, Maputo, Mozambique; 2Department of Nutrition, Ministry of Health, Maputo, Mozambique; 3Superior Institute of Health Sciences, Maputo, Mozambique; 4Institute of Hygiene and Topical Medicine, Nova University Lisbon, Lisbon, Portugal; 5Institute for International Programs at Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, USA. Background: Health systems play a crucial role in the delivery of nutrition-specific interventions for children and mothers, still, the quality and more specifically readiness of health services have not been widely tracked. We explored the access and readiness of health facilities to deliver nutrition services for pregnant women and children. Objective: To assess the readiness of health facilities to provide maternal and child nutrition services in Mozambique. Methods: We defined indicators of readiness for 7 maternal and child nutrition interventions: anemia testing with iron supplementation, folic acid supplementation, breastfeeding promotion, pregnancy growth monitoring, vitamin A supplementation, preventive zinc supplementation, and child growth monitoring. We used data from the 2018 Mozambique SARA health facility survey to calculate readiness scores for each facility in the country. A facility was considered “ready” if it both stated that it offered the intervention and if it had the physical inputs required for service delivery. After calculating readiness scores, we used geospatial data from the WorldPop initiative to estimate the proportion of people in Mozambique within 10 kilometers of a ready facility. For each square kilometer in the country, we identified all the facilities in range. If at least one facility within 10 kilometers was "ready", we considered all the people in the square kilometer to have access to a ready facility. In this way, for each province and for the country as a whole, we calculated the proportion of people with access to a ready facility, for each of the 7 nutrition interventions. Results: At the national level, 29.1% and 37.3% of the population within 10 kilometers of a facility that is ready to deliver all maternal nutrition services and all child nutrition services, respectively. The north region has the lowest rates for both maternal (19.4%) and child nutrition (26.9%) compared to south and center regions. Nampula (14.9%) and Zambézia (17.9%) are the least ready provinces to deliver maternal services. Nampula (20.4%) and Cabo Delgado (21.2%) are the least ready to deliver child nutrition services. Among interventions, anemia testing with iron supplementation for pregnant women (45.1%) and preventive zinc supplementation for children (50.3%) showed the least structural readiness across Mozambique. Conclusions: Improving nutrition in Mozambique will require multisectoral effects both within and outside of the health system. Although facility-based interventions are not sufficient by themselves, they are a necessary piece of an overall strategy to ensure that all mothers and children in Mozambique achieve full health. Currently, only a minority of people in Mozambique have access to a health facility that is ready to deliver all maternal and child nutrition interventions. If we are to improve nutrition in Mozambique, we must invest in robust supply chains, particularly in the north of the country, to ensure that every health facility has the needed supplies and equipment to deliver nutrition interventions. Funding source: European Union; Acknowledgments: Technical Working Women, Child Health and Nutrition Platform of the National Observatory of Health and Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian.

Speaker(s):
  • Reka Maulide Cane, MSc, Instituto Nacional de Saude (National Institute of Health), MoH, Mozambique

Infant feeding is associated with disease comorbidities including autism in the neurodevelopmental disorder fragile X syndrome

Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Infant feeding is associated with disease comorbidities including autism in the neurodevelopmental disorder fragile X syndrome Cara Westmark, Department of Neurology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI Breastfeeding is associated with numerous health benefits in infants, but early life nutrition has not been specifically studied in the neurodevelopmental disorder fragile X syndrome (FXS). Herein, we evaluate associations between the consumption of breast milk versus formula during infancy and the prevalence of autism, allergies, diabetes, gastrointestinal (GI) problems and seizures in participants with FXS. The study design was a retrospective survey of families enrolled in the Fragile X Online Registry and Accessible Research Database (FORWARD). There was a 73% rate of breastfeeding in the enrolled participants with an 81% success rate for at least 3 months, 73% for 6 months and 41% for 12 months of age or longer. There was a 1.7-fold reduction in the prevalence of autism in participants with FXS who were fed breast milk for 12 months or longer and a 1.9-fold decrease in autism in participants reporting no use of any infant formula. The most common reasons for cessation of breastfeeding were reduced milk production and age of the child. There were strong negative correlations between increased time the infant with FXS was fed breast milk and the prevalence of autism and seizures and moderate negative correlations with the prevalence of GI problems and allergies. However, participants reporting GI problems or allergies commenced these comorbidities significantly earlier than participants that were not fed breast milk. Parsing the data by sex indicated that males exclusively fed breast milk exhibited decreased prevalence of GI problems and allergies. These data suggest that long-term and exclusive use of breast milk are associated with reduced prevalence of autism, GI problems and allergies in FXS, although breast milk is associated with the earlier development of GI problems and allergies.

Speaker(s):

Concurrent Monitoring and Validation of POSHAN-II, Rajasthan, India

Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Concurrent Monitoring and Validation of POSHAN-II, Rajasthan, India Authors and Affiliations *Shobana Sivaraman, Senior Research Officer, IIHMR University, Jaipur Laxman Sharma, Assistant Professor, School of Development Studies, IIHMR University, Jaipur Dr D K Mangal, Professor (Public Health) & Dean Research, IIHMR University, Jaipur Abstract Background Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) is a life-threatening factor for children because of their lack of immunity to infections and diseases. Community Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) is an evidence-based approach implemented in more than 70 countries to manage and treat SAM and MAM U5 years children. In 2015, National Health Mission, Government of Rajasthan implemented CMAM by adopting POSHAN (Proactive and Optimum care of children through Social Household Approach for Nutrition) strategy to treat SAM children without medical complication using Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) Kit. The community-based intervention was implemented in two phases. CMAM POSHAN-II was implemented in 2018, covering 20 districts of Rajasthan. In CMAM, POSHAN-II around 375,533 children were screened and 10,344 children were identified and enrolled for treatment. IIHMR University assessed the implementation effectiveness through concurrent monitoring and validation of the activities performed by ASHA and ANM under POSHAN II. Study methodology It is a concurrent monitoring and validation study. The study area was five districts of Rajasthan selected with geographical importance. POSHAN Phase II programme was implemented in 20 districts. The 20 districts were divided geographically into five regions and from each region, one district was selected. The selected five districts are Ajmer, Baran, Rajasamund, Jaisalmer and Udaipur. From each district, one block was selected using simple random sampling. In each block, eight POSHAN centres were further selected using systematic random sampling. Around 40 POSHAN centres were concurrently monitored in five districts to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. The study design was to evaluate one POSHAN centre in one week (simultaneously in all five districts) and thus 40 POSHAN centres covered in eight weeks. The study tool developed was a semi-structured questionnaire which has a combination of both closed and open-ended questions. The semi-structured questionnaire was filled with the collective responses and observations made from mothers and or caregivers of SAM children, and activities carried out by Auxiliary Nurse and Midwife (ANM) and Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA). The data collected was the mixture of the respondent response and block coordinator observation. Data was collected using CsPro software (Android version) using tablet. Findings Overall, it was observed that only 68% of POSHAN centres followed the recommended procedure to measure height, weight and MUAC. Around 88% of POSHAN centres in Ajmer and Jaisalmer followed the recommended procedure for anthropometric measurements, followed by Baran (38 %) and Rajasamund (25 %). In 95% of POSHAN centres, MOYO chart is used in the right procedure by the ANM. It was observed that 70 % of POSHAN centres provided counselling to the mothers about feeding EDNS to the child. It was further investigated that 75% of POSHAN centres in Baran provided counselling to mothers on feeding EDNS to the child, followed by Udaipur and Jaisalmer. It was found that only 43 % of POSHAN centres provided counselling on adequate feeding requirements. During home visits, EDNS was found to be consumed by all the SAM children expect a few rare cases. Quantity of consumption of EDNS per day is overall found to be less than anticipated. Initially, mothers placed the EDNS packets in the container, but later, by the third or fourth week, it was found that container was used for some other household purpose. The clips provided to close the EDNS packets got broken and they did not receive any replacement clips. Many of the households reported that ASHA visits their house occasionally. In quite a few households, mothers reported that they wash hands before feeding the child. However, in a few households, mothers did not take any interest in any such behavioural changes. It was observed that behavioural changes were observed prominently in those households where ASHA visits regularly. Non-programme Implementation villages were visited to observe the procedures followed to identify and treat SAM and MAM children. It was found that ANM and ASHA were not aware of the z-score, MUAC and appetite test. They identify the SAM and MAM children using growth monitoring chart. The stadiometers and weight machines were not functioning properly. There were few records maintained for SAM and MAM children. SAM children are referred to MTC. MAM children are followed by ASHA and AWW. Both SAM and MAM children are given extra Poshahar through Anganwadi Centre. Recommendations · ANM’s should be trained well in anthropometric measurements, especially in measurement of Mid Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC). The manual for anthropometric measurements should be used frequently by ANM. · ANM’s may be provided with flash cards which will help them better to conduct POSHAN DIVAS in a systematic way. · District Programme officer from NHM or any senior official from the co-funding agencies should visit during POSHAN DIVAS for supportive supervision. · ANM can also make a few visits to SAM children households to check the status of the child as well as to verify the planned activities performed by ASHA. · ASHA can be trained more systematically on anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and Mid Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) · ASHA may be trained to observe and identify for any medical complications in the child. · ASHA should be instructed to use the IEC materials on handwashing, hygienic feeding, supplementary foods etc. during household visits. · Along with ASHA, ANM and AWW should also undertake necessary follow-up of defaulter SAM cases to motivate them to visit POSHAN centre and take advantage of nutrition supplementation intervention.

Speaker(s):

Pre-pregnancy dietary patterns and risk of preterm birth and low birth weight: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health

Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Pre-pregnancy dietary patterns and risk of preterm birth and low birth weight: findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health Dereje G. Gete *, Michael Waller, Gita D. Mishra School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia Findings from previous studies on associations between pre-pregnancy dietary patterns and preterm birth and low birth weight (LBW) are limited and inconsistent. This study aimed to examine the association between pre-pregnancy dietary patterns and the risk of preterm birth and LBW. This study included 3422 and 3580 singleton live births from the Australian longitudinal study on women’s health (ALSWH) for the analyses of preterm birth and LBW, respectively. We used factor analyses and the healthy eating index-2015 (HEI-2015) score to derive maternal dietary patterns. Four dietary patterns were identified with factor analyses: meats and high-fats; prudent diets; sugar, refined grains, and processed foods; and traditional vegetables. Preterm birth and LBW were assessed using maternal reports from ALSWH data between 2003 and 2015. Greater adherence to traditional vegetables pattern before pregnancy was associated with a lower risk of preterm birth and spontaneous preterm birth after adjustments for lifestyle factors and pregnancy complications, highest vs lowest tertile (AOR= 0.72, 95%CI: 0.53, 0.99) and (RRR= 0.62, 95% CI: 0.38, 1.00), respectively. However, these associations were attenuated by the pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). No significant associations were observed between pre-pregnancy dietary patterns and LBW. This study suggests that better adherence to traditional vegetables pattern before pregnancy may have a beneficial effect on lowering the risk of preterm birth, particularly spontaneous preterm birth. This finding warrants further examination.

Speaker(s):

Factors associated with undernutrition in Indian children under five - A Literature Review

Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Factors associated with undernutrition in Indian children under five - A Literature Review Introduction: Undernutrition in children contributes to the burden of childhood and adult onset diseases. In India, multiple studies have identified varied factors associated with childhood undernutrition. A comprehensive review of these factors to identify the drivers of childhood malnutrition would help policy makers and researchers to strategize their programme planning and implementation. The present literature review aims to collate these factors that are associated with undernutrition in young Indian children. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was performed using two databases i.e. PubMed and Web of Science from January 2015 to August 2020. The prevalence of undernutrition among Indian children from the primary studies conducted from various parts of the country was collated. In addition, the factors associated with undernutrition (categorized into proximal, intermediate and distal factors) using the Integrated Life Course and Social Determinants of Aboriginal Health (ILCSDAH) model was collated and analysed. Results: A total of 22 studies reported the prevalence of growth failure in children

Speaker(s):

Pre-term delivery and neonatal deaths among anaemic pregnant women in the Bolgatanga metropolis of Ghana

Oct 21, 2020 12:00am ‐ Oct 21, 2020 12:00am

Pre-term delivery and neonatal deaths among anaemic pregnant women in the Bolgatanga metropolis of Ghana Authors: Gideon Helegbe1, Paul Aryee2, Mohammed Baba Sulemana3 1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, UDS, Tamale, Ghana; 2Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Allied Health Sciences, Tamale, Ghana; 3Department of Pharmacy, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, UDS, Tamale, Ghana. Anaemia is of major public health interest. When left untreated among a vulnerable group such as pregnant women, it could lead to poor pregnancy outcomes such as pre-term delivery or death of the mother or neonate or both. However, data on the prevalence of preterm deliveries and its association with mortality in anaemic pregnant women in the study area is scanty. Thus the study sought to investigate the prevalence of pre-term deliveries in relation to neonatal deaths among anaemic pregnant women in the Bolgatanga Regional Hospital in Upper East region of Ghana during the past five years. A retrospective study design was adopted between March and May, 2016. Records of 201 anaemic women during any trimester of their pregnancy who delivered in the hospital in the last five years were included in the study. Data on the socio-demographic characteristics, health status, and birth outcome of participants were captured. Analyses done using SPSS version 18, whilst considering significant differences at p < 0.05. More than half of the anaemic women (52.2%, n= 105) had pre-term deliveries while neonatal mortality was 8.5% (n=17). Child mortality among preterm women was significantly higher compared to that of normal term women (p

Speaker(s):
  • Gideon Helegbe, PhD, University for Development Studies, School of Medicine and Health Sciences
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