Blood-derived plasma mediates exercise-induced hippocampal neuroplasticiy and reduces neuroinflammation.

Identification: De Miguel, Zurine


Description

Blood-derived plasma mediates exercise-induced hippocampal neuroplasticiy and reduces neuroinflammation.
 
De Miguel, Zurine1,2, Willoughby, Drew1,2 , Wyss-Coray, Tony1,2
1Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; 2Center for Tissue Regeneration, Repair and Restoration, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA
 
Voluntary wheel running potently stimulates hippocampal neuroplasticity and reduces neuroinflammation, both of which are common neurobiological substrates to cognitive impairment observed in neurodegenerative disorders and aging. Although the effect of exercise training on neurogenesis and neuroinflammation has been widely documented, whether the impact of exercise training on the brain is limited to local or systemic effects on the periphery is a long-standing question. Here, we show for the first time that intravenous transfer of plasma from runners to non-running mice confers the exercise-induced increases in proliferation and survival of new born granule cells. Furthermore, we show that plasma alone mimics the induction of neuroplasticity genes observed with running and reduces the neuroinflammatory response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS). These findings reveal that exercise modulates neuroplasticity and neuroinflammation via systemic plasma factors and have important implications for understanding the mechanisms by which exercise modulates the brain.

Credits

Credits: None available.

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